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LITTLE ROCK – Since the passage of Amendment 75, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has made it a priority to increase the amount of enforcement in every county of The Natural State. Each county has at least two officers assigned to patrol its woods and waters, and officers work together to target heavily used areas during certain times of the year. But with all these added men and women, the AGFC has only 180 wildlife officers when at full staff.

With only 180 wildlife officers to cover more than 3.4 million acres of hunting and fishing area in Arkansas, the deck may seem stacked in favor of poachers. Thanks to concerned sportsmen and sportswomen who care about Arkansas’s natural resources, the AGFC continues to make a strong statement to people who try to skirt the law and ignore wildlife regulations.

Anyone who witnesses a wildlife violation is encouraged to call the AGFC via telephone at 800-482-9262 to turn the violator in.

“We make a lot of cases thanks to tips from concerned citizens,” said Maj. Jason Parker with the AGFC. “Some of the contacts are even made by friends and family members of the people being reported.”

The AGFC’s radio room is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to receive calls about poaching. They can inform a local officer, who will get back in touch with the contact.

“We keep all sources anonymous if they wish, and we do offer rewards of up to $1,000 for information leading the arrest of some violators,” Parker said.

If someone doesn’t want to talk over the phone, they still can report a violation anonymously, using the AGFC’s Text a Tip service. To send the anonymous tip via text message, text “AGFC,” followed by the tip to TIP411 (847411). You will then receive a thank-you text acknowledging that the text has been received. CitizenObserver, the TIP411 provider, uses technology that removes all identifying information before the AGFC receives the text so that the AGFC cannot identify the sender.

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Public Information Officer | jerry.kane@nebraska.gov | 402.471.5008

Fortenberry co-introduces bipartisan bill to conserve wildlife

LINCOLN, Neb. – Congress took a step to address the critical need for wildlife conservation on Dec. 14. U.S. House Reps. Jeff Fortenberry (R-Neb.) and Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.) introduced a bill to fund state wildlife conservation using existing mineral and energy royalties from federal lands.

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, if passed, would invest in proactive, voluntary, incentive-based habitat conservation projects with private landowners by implementing Nebraska’s State Wildlife Action Plan, called the Nebraska Natural Legacy Project.

Habitat improvements would benefit rare species, as well as common species such as turkeys and deer, by enhancing grasslands, combating invasive species, restoring wetlands and improving woodlands. It also would support education and create new opportunities for Nebraskans to enjoy wildlife and wild places.

Fortenberry has consistently supported wildlife conservation and is co-leading the proposed policy changes needed to care fully for all of our species.

“The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act is an exciting new policy approach to wildlife management and care for our natural resources,” Fortenberry said. “This legislation will help at-risk species before they require the expensive, restrictive measures required by the Endangered Species Act.”

Nationally, more than 12,000 species have been identified as species of greatest conservation need. In Nebraska, nearly 90 species are considered at-risk of extinction.

This bill would not require taxpayers or businesses to pay more, but instead it would allow all Americans to become investors in fish and wildlife conservation.

The bill is supported by the Alliance for America’s Fish and Wildlife, which has expanded from a partnership represented by the outdoor recreation retail and manufacturing sector, the energy and automotive industries, private landowners, educational institutions, conservation organizations, sportsmen’s groups and state and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

In August, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission passed a resolution supporting the Alliance for America’s Fish and Wildlife’s efforts to diversify and expand funding for the thousands of plants and animals in Nebraska.

“We can’t adequately address the changing needs of our constituents or the needs of all of Nebraska’s fish and wildlife with the resources we currently have,” said Nebraska Game and Parks Director Jim Douglas. “This funding source will ensure that future generations can enjoy thriving fish and wildlife populations.”

For more information, visit OurNatureUSA.com.

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission
2200 North 33rd Street
Lincoln, NE 68503
402.471.0641
www.OutdoorNebraska.org

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